Enjoy a pampering FREE Lancome makeover

Ever once in a while, all moms just have to take a break from the daily grind for a little ME time. Are you up for a break? Well now, calling all kikay moms! Come to Rustan’s and pamper yourself to a free makeover with Lancôme’s Color Experts this September!

Free consultation on proper skin care, base application, eye color advice and more! Try Lancôme’s newest Onyx Splendor 2008 Fall collection, and our new makeup products — Color Fever Dewy Shine lipsticks, Ombre Absolue eyeshadows and Virtuose Black Carat mascara!

Call 813-3739 (Rustan’s Makati) or 633-4636 (Rustan’s Shangri-la Plaza) and ask for the Lancôme counter to set up your free makeup session with one of Lancôme’s Colour Experts!

GELA LAUREL-STEHMEIER
September 12 in Rustan’s Shangri-La Plaza
September 19 in Rustan’s Makati

SABS HERNANDEZ
September 26 in Rustan’s Makati
September 27 in Rustan’s Shangri-La Plaza

TATIN YANG
September 13, 20, 27 in Rustan’s Makati

MARIS DELOS REYES
September 12 in Rustan’s Makati
September 19 in Rustan’s Shangri-La Plaza

STACEY TAN GANA
September 13, 20, 26 in Rustan’s Shangri-La Plaza

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

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Sept 27: FREE Museum Day 2008

As a young mom, it’s increasingly a challenge to come up with activities which are both cost effective and intellectually stimulating.

On Sept 27, enjoy free general admission for you and a guest to one of over a hundred museums and cultural venues in the United States. Just download the admission card here and present it at participating Museum Day locations. Find the list of museums here.

Mark the date on your calendars and take advantage of the opportunity to introduce your child to a new cultural experience. He or she just might enjoy it. =)

As a side note, some participating museums may already have a free admission year round. Good to note which dates are “free admission” days.

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

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Free Debt Snowball worksheet from Vertex

Buffeted at all sides by credit card bills?  Feel that you can’t get out of debtors hell? Start ploughing your way out via the free debt snowball calculator from Vertex 24. 

From the description:
This spreadsheet allows you to choose different debt reduction strategies, including the debt snowball effect (paying the lowest balance first) and highest interest first. Just choose the strategy from a dropdown box after you enter your creditor information into the worksheet…. also includes debt reduction information and resources, as well as descriptions of the different strategies you might want to try out with the worksheet.

Whether you subscribe to Dave Ramsey’s debt snowball or the “high interest first method”, the spreadsheet will do all the math for you. Brilliant! 

Did I already mention that it’s FREE?  =)

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

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Severn Suzuki: The Little Girl who Roared

When we were still little, more often than not, we were told that we were too young, too idealistic, too [fill in the blanks] to deal with the harshness of the real world. But then again… if not now, then when? We were also taught not to speak unless spoken too… that adults knew what was best.

I admire the parents of Severn for fostering her environmental and social awareness and raising her to be unafraid to speak her mind. In her speech at the 1992 Rio Earth Summit, she blasted the adults, telling them bluntly: “In school you teach us not to fight with others, to work things out, to respect others, to clean up our mess, not to hurt other creatures, to share, not be greedy. Then why do you go out and do the things you tell us not to do? You grownups say you love us, but I challenge you, please, to make your actions reflect your words.” She was only 12.

10 year later, a slightly disillusioned Severn told Time Magazine that “as a young adult, I’m learning that as we have to make choices—education, career, lifestyle—life gets more and more complicated. We are beginning to feel pressure to produce and be successful. We are learning a shortsighted way of looking at the future, focusing on four-year government terms and quarterly business reports. We are taught that economic growth is progress, but we aren’t taught how to pursue a happy, healthy or sustainable way of living. And we are learning that what we wanted for our future when we were 12 was idealistic and naive.”

Can one person make a huge difference? Maybe not. But collectively, maybe we can. I agree that we each have to make an conscious effort to remain connected to the natural world. “Real environmental change depends on us. We can’t wait for our leaders. We have to focus on what our own responsibilities are and how we can make the change happen.

Be the change that you want to see in the world.  Teach your children to be the same.

Related posts:

Love Mother Earth and save money too

We are what we do. Be the change you want to see.

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

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Quote of the Day

So what’s the secret to being a great mom? Time and patience. To me, you bring children into the world and yes, it does take time, it does take patience— because no two children are alike. To me, you take every child and what their biggest strength is and you build upon that strength to make them have a consistently good self-esteem and make them feel good about themselves.

— Debbie Phelps

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

Subscribe to my feed or subscribe via email to get notified of my next post.

Picky eaters are made, not born

I count my lucky stars that A is growing up to be an omnivore. We have deliberately gone out of our way to introduce our son to different tastes (from sweet to sour) and cuisines from different parts of the world. It is my personal philosophy that with our ever shrinking borders, globalization pertains not only to business but to cultural experiences as well. In order to succeed, we must teach our children to be open to new smells, new tastes and new textures.

A is equally as comfortable using chopsticks as he is the fork and spoon. For him, wasabi chips are yummy, as is chicken curry. Don’t get me wrong. It hasn’t exactly been an easy journey. We have had a number of spirited negotiations over what to eat and how much to eat but A has learned that everything should be tried at least twice. If he really doesn’t like it, then it’s ok. At least he tried. I breathe a sigh of relief and satisfaction whenever he finishes what’s on his plate and asks for more (which is happening more and more often).   Funnily enough,  2 years ago,  his class conducted a blind taste test to illustrate the various tastes: sweet, sour, salty etc.  He was the only kid who said “yummy” to all, including patis.  =)

A few days ago, we had a mini-encounter which got me thinking about picky eaters. Research has shown that while food neophobia (fear of of new food) appears to be genetic, it can be addressed. Biology is not destiny. Ellyn Satter has written a wonderful book called Child of Mine: Feeding with Love and Good Sense which posits a simple yet very powerful message: It is the parent’s job to determine the what and when of feeding: what food gets offered and when. And it is the child’s job to determine if he will eat the food and how much.

The Mayo Clinic has also put forth practical tips to avoid mealtime battles. Here are some of my favorites:

  1. Respect your child’s hunger — or lack thereof. Young children tend to eat only when they’re hungry. If your child isn’t hungry, don’t force a meal or snack.
  2. Stay calm. If your child senses that you’re unhappy with his or her eating habits, it may become a battle of wills. Threats and punishments only reinforce the power struggle.
  3. Boycott the clean plate club. Don’t force your child to clean his or her plate. This may only ignite — or reinforce — a power struggle over food. Instead, allow your child to stop eating when he or she is full.
  4. Leave taste out of it. Talk about a food’s color, shape, aroma and texture — not whether it tastes good.
  5. Be patient with new foods. Young children often touch or smell new foods, and may even put tiny bits in their mouths and then take them back out again. Your child may need repeated exposure to a new food before he or she takes the first bite.
  6. Recruit your child’s help. At the grocery store, ask your child to help you select fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods. Don’t buy anything that you don’t want your child to eat. At home, encourage your child to help you rinse veggies, stir batter or set the table.
  7. Set a good example. If you eat a variety of healthy foods, your child is more likely to follow suit.
  8. Minimize distractions. Turn off the television during meals, and don’t allow books or toys at the table.
  9. Don’t offer dessert as a reward. Withholding dessert sends the message that dessert is the best food, which may only increase your child’s desire for sweets. You might select one or two nights a week as dessert nights, and skip dessert the rest of the week. Or redefine dessert as fruit, yogurt or other healthy choices.
  10. Expect some food preferences to stick. As kids mature, they tend to become less picky about food. Still, everyone has food preferences. Don’t expect your child to like everything.

It is the small steps that count. Don’t give up (or in) on your child and head to the nearest burger or pizza joint every single time. More importantly, don’t have separate foods for different individuals. We subscribe to the school of thought that eating is a social experience meant to be shared by all and it simply won’t do if you have family members cut themselves off from the rest.

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

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Quote of the Day

Live your life with a purpose beyond yourself, and you’ll find that the world is as bold and broad as the interests that brought you here today.

— Bryan Gumbel

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Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets reduced to essentials. ~Meryl Streep

Subscribe to my feed or subscribe via email to get notified of my next post.